According to Michael Wasser, writing for Jobs With Justice, the NLRB’s joint employer classification “is a big deal.”

“We know McDonald’s sets rigorous operating standards for its franchisees, from menus, to uniforms, to employment practices,” writes Wasser. “And we know that they monitor and enforce those standards at the corporate level. McDonald’s therefore shouldn’t be able to walk away when those practices appear to run afoul of the law.”

McDonald’s immediately released a statement saying it will “contest the joint employer allegations as well as the unfair labor practice charges in the proper forums.”

But Micah Wissinger, an attorney who levied one of the cases on behalf of New York City McDonald’s workers, said, “McDonald’s and its corporate lobbyists continue to claim that the company has no responsibility for workers at its restaurants, but today’s complaint underscores the obvious fact that McDonald’s is the boss.”

“The complaint validates what workers have been saying over and over again—that McDonald’s requires franchisees to adhere to such regimented rules and regulations that there’s no doubt who’s really in charge,” Wissinger continued.

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