Andrey Danilov, a part-time hunter of ancient mammoth tusks, told the Post, “It smells like dead bodies.”

Yakutia’s permafrost is notable both because of its construction and the potential consequences of its continued thaw. As Mooney and Troianovski explained:

The Post report’s photos and videos, by Michael Robinson Chavez, include a brief breakdown of Siberia’s Yedoma permafrost and scientists concerns. Watch:

The Post‘s look at permafrost thaw in eastern Siberia was published about a week after a new report from the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that focused on the ocean and cryosphere, which refers to the world’s frozen zones, including permafrost.

Noting that more than half of Russia’s territory is located in the cryosphere, The Moscow Times on Thusday highlighted some of the IPCC’s findings for the country’s permafrost:

The IPCC’s broader findings, as Common Dreams reported when they were released last week, underscored the necessity of pursuing “unprecedented transitions in all aspects of society” to sustain life on Earth.

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