“We’re really hoping Congress takes seriously the importance of reauthorizing it with some key enhancements that we’re collectively asking for and a three-month extension does not get that work done,” Terri Poore, policy director of the National Alliance to End Sexual Violence, told the Washington Post.

VAWA has been reauthorized three times since the landmark legislation, which was the first federal law to combat domestic violence and has provided grants for victims’ services and prevention programs, was first passed in 1994—always with bipartisan support. As of Tuesday, 163 Democratic members of the House and zero Republicans had signed on as co-sponsors of the bill.

“It’s been really sad to me and I really hope before it is too late we will see members of Congress who have proclaimed support for survivors connect it to VAWA,” Jess Davidson, executive director of End Rape on Campus, told the Post. “I think that allowing VAWA to be brought to the brink like this when our country is having such an important national conversation to me really shows that Congress is not as with survivors of sexual assaults as they claim to be.”

On social media, a number of critics connected Republicans’ insistence on confirming Kavanaugh regardless of at least two allegations against him, and the hostility the party has shown toward his accusers, with its refusal to fully reauthorize VAWA.

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